Ki Moments Blog

Support for life’s “key” moments.

Showing posts with the tag “Leadership Presence”

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  • January 12, 2021

    What is Leadership Presence? -- Finding Center, Accomplishing Purpose

    What is Leadership Presence? -- Finding Center, Accomplishing Purpose

    Power properly understood is nothing but the ability to achieve purpose...."

    ~ Martin Luther King, Jr., "Where Do We Go From Here"

    "Presence" can be tricky to define, and "leadership presence" trickier. Google searches produce thousands of pages and hundreds of thousands of hits. We're interested, it seems, in knowing what they mean, whether we have them, and how to acquire them.

    Fact is, we all have presence--a quality of mind, body and spirit that is us. Sometimes our presence is more evident to others, sometimes less. Sometimes we feel big, sometimes small and contracted.

    When we walk into a room, we influence the people and the environment in that room by our presence in it. It has changed because of us. And we are changed by our experience of what is already there.

    If you're aware of energy flow, you'll observe these changes when people enter and leave, and you'll gain awareness of how you can be more intentional about the influence you have.

    How would you describe your unique presence? ...

  • August 19, 2014

    The Manager as Mediator--Step 5: Bringing the Parties Together

    The Manager as Mediator--Step 5: Bringing the Parties Together

    How do I manage conflict between employees?
    What should I do when coworkers don't get along?

    In May, Ki Moments began a series, The Manager as Mediator, designed to help leaders address organizational and personality conflict involving coworkers, management, and leadership teams. The 5-step model offers a coaching intervention and step-by-step process for developing skills in yourself and the people you support.

    This post focuses on the last step in the process: Step #5: Bring the Parties Together.

  • August 5, 2014

    The Manager as Mediator--Step 4: Build and Teach Conflict and Communication Skills (Part 2)

    The Manager as Mediator--Step 4: Build and Teach Conflict and Communication Skills (Part 2)


    In the last Ki Moments post, we left our Manager as Mediator 5-step model in the middle of Step 4: Build and Teach Conflict and Communication Skills. Step 4 has two parts:

    • Quality of Being: With what attitudes and awareness do I approach the conversation?
    • Communication Strategies: How do I communicate my point of view and willingly entertain and acknowledge another?

    We covered Part 1 in the last post. Today the focus is Part 2: Communication Strategies.

    We are preparing the parties to meet jointly. When that happens, you'd like them to be able to listen to each other, propose alternatives, and build solutions. You don't want them reacting emotionally, shutting down, or pretending things are all right when they aren't. This means they've learned and practiced some skills.

  • July 22, 2014

    The Manager as Mediator--Step 4: Build and Teach Conflict and Communication Skills (Part 1)

    The Manager as Mediator--Step 4: Build and Teach Conflict and Communication Skills (Part 1)

    I’ve seen in my work the difficulty leaders and managers have dealing with personality conflicts between employees. In workshops and coaching, leaders most often tell me they want to:

    • help employees get along better.
    • skillfully address disagreements between coworkers.
    • model the conflict skills they want for their team.

    Recently, Ki Moments began a series, The Manager as Mediator, designed to help leaders address organizational and personality conflict involving coworkers, management, and leadership teams. As a coaching intervention, the 5-step model offers a step-by-step process for developing skills in yourself and the people you support.

    We’ve offered an introduction and posts on:

    Step #1: First Manage You
    Step #2: Measure and Gain Commitment
    Step #3: Meet Individually First

    This post focuses on Step #4: Build and Teach Conflict and Communication Skills.